Visiting Robbers Cave: A History of Psychology Roadtrip

10 July 2013

Robbers Cave sign

This is a special post co-authored by Jacy Young and Jennifer Bazar and published simultaneously at both the Advances in the History of Psychology (AHP) and FieldNotes blogs.

This June, following a successful Cheiron meeting in Dallas, Texas two of AHP’s bloggers (Jacy Young and Jennifer Bazar, the latter also of FieldNotes) along with Kelli Vaughn-Johnson traveled to Robbers Cave State Park in Southeast Oklahoma. Our goal was to track down the Boy Scouts camp used as the site of the now infamous 1954 Robbers Cave experiment and see what remains nearly 60 years later.

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Morning with Gertrude Stein

21 April 2011

Day 3 AM: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Spent the morning at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library on Yale University’s campus going through a a part of Gertrude Stein‘s correspondence. The building really stands out from the rest of the Yale buildings in the area from the exterior but the interior is quite interesting – walking in you face the glass-encased stacks filled with rare books.

I requested some of the folders related to Stein’s Radcliffe days: her correspondence with William James, Hugo Münsterberg, Leon Mendez Solomons and Adele Oppenheimer. It was a fun collection to look through – my favourite letter was from Münsterberg in which he described Stein as the “ideal student” and expressed what a pleasure she was to teach. I also enjoyed Solomons’ reflections on being a student in the Harvard psychology department.  


Yale’s Archives & Manuscripts

20 April 2011

Day 2: Feeling rather scholarly

Walking through the giant wooden doors of Sterling Memorial Library this morning was an awe-inspiring experience. There was just something surreal about pulling the big iron door handles and stepping under the intricately carved stone entrance-way beneath William Osler‘s words “The Library is the Heart of the University” – it’s just not experience I have on a regular basis.

I wasn’t prepared for the grandeur of the interior of Yale University‘s social science and humanities library – based on the arched ceilings, stained glass, and extraordinary Gothic details I was certain the building was a re-purposed cathedral. It turns out that it was built in 1930 on the design of James Gamble Rogers, a Yale alumni. The second largest university library in North America, it holds over 12.5 million volumes – and is home to the Manuscripts and Archives collection. Read the rest of this entry »


“Meeting” the famous Phineas Gage

11 March 2011

Day Trip: the Warren Anatomical Museum

I finally made it to the Warren Anatomical Museum – it’s been on my “things to see in Boston” list for ages but for some reason has always seemed too far out of the way on previous trips.

The museum officially dates to 1847. It was created by John Collins Warren who started the collection while he was still a young medical student in the late eighteenth century. Warren graduated from Harvard in 1797 and later practiced with his father at the same institution (that his father had helped to found), assisting with lectures and anatomical demonstrations. He would go on to become a Professor of Anatomy and Surgery and would perform the first public demonstration of ether as an anesthetic at the Massachusetts General Hospital in 1846.

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